Cooking with Friends · General · Recipes

The Best Waffles EVER

This is no exaggeration. This recipe is totally for the best waffles you’ve ever tasted. I have two separate groups who have eaten them and can attest that their taste buds were singing upon consumption of these masterpiece waffles. These waffles might not be your go-to for a last minute breakfast, but a quick prep the night before makes it SOOO worth it.

IMG_4194

I had been holding onto this waffle recipe for a while that I found on Pinterest (surprise, surprise). Waffles are my favorite sweet breakfast (followed closely by pancakes and miles ahead of french toast, blah), and I have quite a few of them saved. But this one had been calling to me because it was different. Yeasted waffles? Like bread? I have to check this out.

The first time I made these waffles was for brunch with friends. We had a Belgian waffle maker and a regular/standard waffle maker. They both came out delicious, but obviously the Belgian was better… by definition. Add some real maple syrup and freshly whipped cream… OMG heaven.

The second time I made these waffles, I already knew what I was getting into – so it was a surprise for them. I brought a batch of the dough/batter up to Chico and was prepared to impress. I was a little nervous because I had talked them up so much as “the best waffles I’ve ever made” and kept hoping that I didn’t mess up the batter and look like a fool. Good news – I didn’t. They were delicious again.

Now, let me explain. These are not your typical fluffy, airy waffles. They are wonderfully dense and have a slight taste of breadiness (is that a word?) from the yeast in the batter. They don’t spread out in the waffle maker as much as regular, thin batter. But don’t worry if they come out a little misshapen or smaller than usual. It won’t matter. As soon as you take a bite, you will be transported to Tasty-town.

I’m sorry I didn’t take more pictures. Maybe next time I make these (and there WILL be a next time), I’ll take some in-progress photos to add to the story and help for following along.


Whole Wheat Yeasted Waffles

Yields about six full waffles, or more if you make them smaller.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 cup Whole Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons (1 package) yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons oil (I used olive both times, but I’m sure any would work)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups milk (I used 1% and soy, both taste great)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Real maple syrup (please don’t skimp on the cheap corn syrup stuff, it’s gross)
  • Toppings, as desired*

Directions

  1. In large mixing bowl, combine flours, yeast, and salt.
  2. In medium saucepan or large microwave safe bowl, combine melted butter, oil, brown sugar and milk. Heat until all melted and combined. Technically the mixture shouldn’t get above 120º to 130º which will kill the yeast. Just don’t let it boil.
  3. Add liquid ingredients to dry ingredients and blend on low speed until combined. Add eggs and vanilla. Beat 2 to 3 minutes on medium speed.
  4. Cover bowl; refrigerate batter several hours or overnight.
  5. In the morning, when you’re ready to cook them, give the batter a quick stir. Scoop it directly into a heated waffle maker (sprayed or greased) and cook per usual.
  6. Top with a generous drizzle of warmed maple syrup and other desired toppings.

These waffles go well with a runny, fried egg and thick pepper bacon. Not necessary, but highly recommended.

*I like to make freshly whipped cream and macerated strawberries. For the strawberries, just slice them up and put them in a bowl with a tablespoon or two of granulated sugar. Mix to coat and let sit the entire time you’re prepping breakfast. The longer they sit, the more syrupy and sweet they’ll be. One cup of heavy whipping cream to one tablespoon sugar (or powdered sugar) is usually a good ratio. Simply whip up the cream until soft peaks form, add the sugar, and beat until stiff peaks form – but make sure not to overwhip or it will turn into a gross mess. Stop just when it looks like the consistency of whipped cream.

Enjoy 🙂

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s